Increasing PR Application Fees

a silhouette of a man looking a graph projected onto a wall / PR Application Fees

An important announcement has been made by the CIC regarding PR Application Fees. As much as we do not want to see it, the government of Canada has no choice but to raise the fees. 

Ways to Become a Permanent Resident

The two main pathways that people take to become citizens in Canada is by the Provincial Nominee Pathway (PNP) and Express Entry.

The PNP is determined by each provincial government. The BC PNP is different from the Alberta PNP and so on. In short, you as an applicant will have a job offer from a workplace in the province you’re interested in. 

Express Entry is a branch of the PNP, but the application process works a little differently. It’s a point-based system designed to make the visa process easier for non-Canadians. These are designed specifically for skilled workers.

PR Application Fees

Regardless of which path you choose, you will have to pay some fees. It starts from the moment you apply. There’ll be a processing fee, and there will be additional fees according to whether you have dependents or a spouse. 

Why are there Fees?

The fees are there mainly as compensation for those who are processing your applications. The money goes directly to them, their skills and expertise. Rest assured, the government of Canada isn’t making you pay these fees for nothing. 

Permanent Resident Fees Increasing

The main fee that is increasing are the application fees. According to the table of increasing fees, the application fees for the following programs are increasing:

  • Skilled Workers & Economic Pilots – $825 → $850
  • Caregiver Pilot – $550 → $570
  • Business – $1,575 → $1,625
  • Family reunification – $475 → $490
  • Protected Persons – $550 → $570
  • Humanitarian → $550 → $570
  • Permit Holders → $325 → $335

Note: These price increases are for the principal applicants of these programs. Anyone accompanying the principal applicant has their own fees to pay, which are also increasing. 

On top of application fees, if you’ve ever browsed through the fee list on Canada’s official site, you might see that there’s something called Right of permanent residence fee. This is actually separate to the program you’re applying to. In some cases, you can apply for the program without the right of permanent residence. Even so, the fee is increasing from $500CAD to $515CAD for principal applicants or accompanying spouses. 

Why are the fees increasing?

Since 2002, the IRCC has made it a pattern to adjust the permanent residence fees every two years. This was initially done to adjust to inflation in Canada. However, the past two years has also caused the spike in prices and that is the pandemic. As the immigration department is trying their hardest to clear up the backlog, they need more manpower to do so.

After You’re Approved

There are still a number of fees you’ll have to pay and steps you’ll have to take. You’ll have to pay for your medical and biometrics, your criminal record check, and even a landing fee. These are not included in the fees that will increase, but you do have to know that they exist so that you know how much to save.

Although the process is long and hard, know that it’s worth it. All your hard work will eventually lead to a brand new life in Canada. 

Sources: Increase in PR Fees Express Entry vs PNP

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